Services for Students with Disabilities

Syllabus Statement

Faculty members should include in each syllabus a statement asking students to inform them of any special needs to ensure that those needs are met in a timely manner. This approach demonstrates to students that instructors are sensitive to and concerned about meeting the needs of ALL students they teach.

Professor lecturing to students in classroom

Op-Ed: Faculty must address mental health | The Michigan Daily

An open letter to the faculty of the University of Michigan:

Over 40 percent of students at the University of Michigan reported having felt so depressed that it was difficult to function at least once during the school year. Additionally, approximately 11 percent said they seriously considered attempting suicide at least once in the last school year. There are now more mental health and well-being student organizations on campus than ever. 


Stockton University - Evaluating Publisher Content for Accessibility

Just as instructors evaluate textbooks and associated materials for relevant and accurate content, evaluating them for accessibility is also a critical part of the review process. How can you, as an instructor, assure that the textbook and tools you select will be accessible to all students? The questions and links on this page will help you to discuss your instructional needs with your publisher representative.


Faculty Procedures | U-M LSA Testing Accommodation Center

Requests for testing accommodations are initiated by the student. A student must meet with Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) to obtain the necessary documentation for approved testing accommodations. SSD will provide the student with a Verified Individualized Services and Accommodations (VISA) form. A student should meet with his/her instructor during the first two weeks of a given academic term to discuss the need for testing accommodation.


Invisible No More | GradHacker

For those who aren’t familiar with the term, “invisible disabilities” aren’t obscure, rare or merely currently “en vogue.” In fact, they are the most common type of disability among college students. Since students whose disabilities are invisible far outweigh those with visible ones, if our goal is to create a truly inclusive classroom, we must do a better job of  understanding 1) who those students are, 2) what obstacles they face and, ultimately, 3) how we can support them to achieve their full potential.



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